Prototypes vs. MVPs: Which One to Choose for Your App?

Many app developers are torn between deciding whether to create a prototype or an MVP for their app.

The first thing you should know is that these words have different meanings in the digital product development context. A prototype is the first version of your idea, while an MVP is a basic but functional version of your idea with just enough features to be useful and deliver value to customers.

Prototypes are usually done on paper (or whiteboard), whereas an MVP can be completed using software tools like PowerPoint or wireframes as well as programming languages and frameworks such as HTML5, CSS3, Java Script, Ruby on Rails, etc.

The main difference between a prototype and an MVP is that prototypes don’t need to work 100% of the time, whereas an MVP needs to work at all times.

What should the first version of your app be – a prototype or a minimum viable product (MVP)?

Prototypes are used for early stage development and feedback gathering while a minimum viable product is designed to test drive the idea with real users. Prototypes may also be good for user experience design testing, market research or competitive analysis. It’s important to note that prototypes should always be built in parallel with an MVP because it gives you more flexibility in terms of what features can be included and which ones need further exploration during this phase of the project.

An advantage of prototyping is that they let your team explore different possibilities before settling on one solution – not only does this save time but it also helps identify potential problems earlier than if you were building from scratch straight into production mode.

The benefits of prototyping and MVP.

See: Mvp vs prototype

Standard benefits:

  • Prototypes let your team explore different possibilities before settling on one solution – not only does this save time but it also helps identify potential problems earlier than if you were building from scratch straight into production mode.
  • They allow developers to create a prototype that is more interactive and real looking, which can help them work out any kinks in the design process.

Emotional benefits:

  • You’ll have the opportunity to show off your creativity and innovative ideas early on in the development process.
  • It can be a good way to generate enthusiasm and excitement.

MVPs are usually better for startups because they help:

  • Establish credibility with potential investors by demonstrating the viability of the product (i.e., it works).
  • They reduce risk as you’ll know what features will work well together, reducing your chances of spending time on features that won’t succeed in the market place.

An advantage of MVP is that the core functionality and design have already been tested so there’s less chance for errors when building out more complex aspects like animations or layouts later on in development process. An MVP also has a higher likelihood of being adopted since customers already understand its value proposition early on, which means an increase in customer acquisition.

The benefits of an MVP:

  • The core functionality and design have already been tested so there’s less chance for errors when building out more complex aspects like animations or layouts later on in development process.
  • It has a higher likelihood of being adopted since customers already understand its value proposition early on, which means an increase in customer acquisition.

Drawbacks: An MVP may not be as rich with features as the final product will be – this can lead to lost opportunities if customers decide they do want all those extra features after their first interaction with your app (i.e., it’s possible that some won’t buy because you didn’t offer what they wanted). In addition, without any marketing materials available yet – such as screenshots, videos and demos – it will be harder to generate interest in the app.

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